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Write From Home
Kim Wilson
P.O. Box 4145
Hamilton, NJ 08610

E-mail: kim @ writefromhome.com

Organize Your Office Supply Cabinet
by Maria Gracia


Are you tired of that overflowing, overstuffed Office Supply Cabinet?

You know, the tall, 3-shelf one that youíre literally scared to open. Itís bulging with pens, labels, disks, binders, post-it notes, paper pads, paper clips and more. Itís so full that you donít even know whatís in there. You canít find what you need when you need it, which causes your blood to boil in frustration. Plus, youíre constantly running out of supplies because thereís no system to let you know when you're running low.

Get it organized and eliminate the stress. Here's a simple, 7 step system

  1. TOO MANY COOKS SPOIL THE POT. The first thing I'd suggest is that 1 person be in charge of the supplies, whether taking supplies out, or putting supplies back in. This person is either going to be you, or someone you delegate this responsibility to.
  2. DIVIDE AND CONQUER. One of the reasons that it's so difficult to find things is because everything is just stacked, one item on top of another and one item in front of another. Try dividing supplies, especially the smaller ones, into labeled organizing containers.

    Covered, plastic Rubbermaid containers work well here, especially the ones you could see through. They stack nicely on top of each other, without toppling. Make sure each container is labeled; not on top -- in front so you can immediately identify the contents.
  3. EMPTY IT OUT. In order to truly organize that cabinet, it's going to have to be emptied out completely.
  4. PLAN AND DESIGNATE. If you have an even mix of supplies, you might consider designating each shelf a different category:
    • Shelf A: Computer Supplies (disks, disk holders)
    • Shelf B: Desk Supplies (paper clips, pens, labels)
    • Shelf C: Large Pads of Paper, 3 Ring Binders and Larger Items
  5. TAKE AN INVENTORY. As you're putting the supplies back into the cabinet, make a running list of everything inside (do this on your computer, alphabetically within each section A, B, and C.) Also list how many of each item you currently have while you're at it. For instance:
    • Shelf A
      Disks (3.5 HD) - 10
      Disk Mailers - 50
      Toner Cartridges - 4
    • Shelf B
      Pens - 20 boxes
      Pencils - 25 boxes
      Paper Clips - 15 boxes
      Scotch Tape - 18 rolls
    • Shelf C
      Binders (1 inch) - 12
      Binders (1 1/2 inch) -14
      Binders (2 inch) - 9
    When you're done making your list, you should have a pretty good idea of what's inside and where.
  6. GIVING OUT SUPPLIES. When somebody needs supplies, they should ask you for them. You can give them what they need, while adjusting how many are now left on the list. (Example: If there were 12 - 1 inch binders and someone just took 5, then there are 7 left.) Indicate this on your list. (By the way, if youíre using the computer for this list, it will be easier to update.)
  7. KEEPING TRACK. Once you notice that a particular office supply is running low, you can simply re-order, without having to take a physical inventory of the cabinet.

by Maria Gracia - Get Organized Now!
Want to get organized? Get your FREE Get Organized Now! Idea-Pak, filled with tips and ideas to help you organize your home, your office and your life, at the Get Organized Now! Web site
http://www.getorganizednow.com

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

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